Weekly News Bulletin

COGS OF INDUSTRY

The charm of a challenger brand is hard to resist – every now and then we all want to root for the underdog. This year we’re due to see a flurry of new, outsider brands enter the market: easyFoodstore (going up against budget stores Lidl and Aldi) and Tunepics (taking on social giants Instagram and Facebook) to name but two. To find out more, check out this list of challenger brands to look out for in 2014.

No prizes for what media Tunepics pairs together

LETTER FROM AMERICA

An unlikely trademark dispute has erupted between The Girl Scouts of America and numerous liquid nicotine companies, over the name ‘Thin Mint’ (trading under Girl Scout Thin Mint cookies and Thin Mint e-cigarettes respectively). It’s definitely an undesirable association for the Scouts, and we think e-cigarette brands should brace for impact. After all, a good Scout is always prepared (for a lawsuit).

The Girl Scouts don’t want e-cigarettes making a mint off their name

PRETTY PACKAGING

Actress, director and screenwriter Gia Coppola has applied her creative flair to her family’s winery, creating GIA by Gia Coppola. The packaging takes an iconoclastic approach to design; the inflated structure feels playful, whilst the down-to-earth block colouring adds a contemporary edge. Holistically, it’s sure to signal something new in the category.

Gia by Gia Coppola

SPOTLIGHT ON AMSTEL

Amstel Premium Pilsener has turned to P.E.T. Engineering to design a 1L plastic beer bottle, offering convenient daily consumption to its Netherlands market. We think the result is a pack that feels somewhat jarring; a long, slender neck and on-pack etching, (borrowing from premium codes of spirits and wine) applied to a rather bulky plastic bottle (more akin to sharing size bottles of Sprite and other fizzy drinks). Is there just something about plastic substrate that’s a barrier for communicating premium quality? What do you think?

Can plastic ever feel truly premium?

AND FINALLY

Google has announced it’s prototyping a fully autonomous car (a vehicle requiring no human intervention to travel). For Google, safety is the key priority; in-built sensors will eradicate blind spots and be able to detect objects up to a distance of two football fields in all directions, additionally the vehicle’s speed will be capped at 25mph. So we’re still a distance from the robot speed-machines seen in sci-fi films, but it’s an exciting journey to be on.

Google – driving change in autonomous motoring

NAME THAT BRAND

Here’s the answer to the Name That Brand from last week. Why not send us a Tweet and tell us if you know this one:

Screen Shot 2014-05-30 at 10.49.52

And then, if you fancy the challenge, play the full game right here.